Mexican Buckeye Ungnadia speciosa

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Ungnadia speciosa

Family:

Sapindaceae

Genus:

Ungnadia

Species:

speciosa

Common Name:

Mexican Buckeye

Lot#:
070211
Seeds Per Pound:
545
Quantity:
1.13 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
12
Germination:
98%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
10-20 feet
Collection Locale:
Missouri
Crop Year:
2007
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
7
In Stock: 1.13 lb
Prices
  • UNGNADIA speciosa

Items are priced on a curve, you can buy any 'bulk quantity' up to what we have in stock, some examples are:
1 packet
8.95
1.41 oz
17.95
1 lb
75.75
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Sand lightly or nick with a file, Soak in water, let stand in water for 6 hours.
Stratification: none required.
Germination: Sow seeds 1/2" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
Other: Germination tends to be slow, Germinates faster in warmer temperatures.
In a Nutshell:
* Ungnadia speciosa , the Mexican Buckeye , is a shrub or small tree native to northeastern Mexico and adjacent western Texas and southern New Mexico in the United States . It is monotypic , the only species in the genus Ungnadia . more...
* Mexican-buckeye, an 8-12 ft., deciduous tree, can reach 30 ft. in height. It is often multi-trunked with with light gray to brown bark, smooth on young branches, becoming fissured with age. Leaves up to 12 inches long, with a central axis supporting 2 to 6 paired leaflets and a terminal one; leaflets up to 5 inches long, ovate to narrower with an elongate tip, rounded base, and serrate margins. Pinnate foliage turns golden yellow in fall. Clusters of bright-pink, fragrant flowers appear before or with the leaves from the axils of the previous season. Fruit distinctive, a light reddish brown when ripe, 3 lobed capsule containing 1 to 3 dark brown to black, shiny seeds 1/2 inch in diameter, the walls of the capsule often persisting through the winter, seeds poisonous.
* From a distance the plants in full flower resemble redbuds or peaches. The sweetish but poisonous seeds are sometimes used by children as marbles. Livestock seldom browse the toxic foliage, but bees produce fragrant honey from the flowers. Although not a true buckeye, it is so called because of the similar large capsules and seeds. This distinct plant, alone in its genus, commemorates Baron Ferdinand von Ungnad, Austrian ambassador at Constantinople, who introduced the Horsechestnut into western Europe in 1576. more...
Usda description:
More info on http://plants.usda.gov