Sweet Cherry, Wild Cherry, Gean, Certified Virus Indexed Mazzard Cherry Prunus avium

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Prunus avium 'CVI'

Family:

Rosaceae

Genus:

Prunus

Species:

avium

Common Name:

Sweet Cherry, Wild Cherry, Gean, Certified Virus Indexed Mazzard Cherry

Seeds Per Pound:
2,240
Quantity:
5.88 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
22
Germination:
91%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
50-100 feet
Collection Locale:
Italy
Crop Year:
2021
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
4

Prunus avium 'CVI'; parent plants indexed for PPV, PNRV, PDV

In Stock: 5.88 lb
Prices
Items are priced on a curve, you can buy any 'bulk quantity' up to what we have in stock, some examples are:
1 packet
$8.95
8 oz
$63.97
1 lb
$114.50
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours. none required. Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours.
Stratification: cold stratify for 120 days. warm stratify for 120 days, cold stratify for 120 days. warm statify for 2 weeks, cold stratify for 120 days. warm stratify for 120 days, cold stratify for 120 days.
Germination: sow seed 3/8 deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed. sow 3/8" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
In a Nutshell:
* 'CVI' stands for Certified Virus Index, the plants from where the seeds have been collected have been tested for the following 3 viruses; PPV, PNRV, PDV more...
* The Alkavo is a selection of various clones from the common Prunus avium. more...
* The hard, reddish-brown wood (cherry wood) is valued as a hardwood for woodturning, and making cabinets and musical instruments.
* The Alkavo selection produces trees that grow about 10% smaller than the common Prunus avium, making them easier to harvest for fruit production. more...
* Cherry wood is also used for smoking foods, particularly meats, in North America, as it lends a distinct and pleasant flavor to the product. more...
* The Alkavo selection is supposed to be more frost hardy than the common Prunus avium. more...
* The parents of these seeds were selected for their superior qualities relating to timber production and grown in a seed orchard in Denmark. more...
* The fruit is a drupe 1–2 cm in diameter (larger in some cultivated selections), bright red to dark purple when mature in mid summer, edible, variably sweet to somewhat astringent and bitter to eat fresh; it contains a single hard-shelled stone 8–12 mm long, 7–10 mm wide and 6–8 mm thick, grooved along the flattest edge more...
* The seed (kernel) inside the stone is 6–8 mm long. The fruit are readily eaten by numerous birds and mammals, which digest the fruit flesh and disperse the seeds in their droppings more...
* The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as the new leaves, borne in corymbs of two to six together, each flower pendent on a 2–5 cm peduncle, 2.5–3.5 cm diameter, with five pure white petals, yellowish stamens, and a superior ovary; they are hermaphroditic , and pollinated by bees . more...
* As a street tree, the lower branches of this tree can be removed to create a high enough canopy to support unobstructed human traffic underneath. more...
* Growing at a medium rate, this tree will produce greater quantities of fruit with a variety of the same species nearby. more...
* Prunus avium is highly tolerant of urban pollution and will even thrive in inner city environments. more...
Short description:
Wikiipedia states: It is a species of cherry, native to Europe, northwest Africa, and western Asia, from the British Isles south to Morocco and Tunisia, north to the Trondheimsfjord region in Norway and east to the Caucasus, and northern Iran, with a small disjunct population in the western Himalaya. Botany: It is a deciduous tree growing to 15-32 m tall, with a trunk up to 1.5 m diameter. Young trees show strong apical dominance with a straight trunk and symmetrical conical crown, becoming rounded to irregular on old trees. The bark is smooth purplish-brown with prominent horizontal grey-brown lenticels on young trees, becoming thick dark blackish-brown and fissured on old trees. The leaves are alternate, simple ovoid-acute, 7–14 cm long and 4–7 cm broad, glabrous matt or sub-shiny green above, variably finely downy beneath, with a serrated margin and an acuminate tip, with a green or reddish petiole 2–3.5 cm long bearing two to five small red glands. The tip of each serrated edge of the leaves also bear small red gland. In autumn, the leaves turn orange, pink or red before falling. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as the new leaves, borne in corymbs of two to six together, each flower pendent on a 2–5 cm peduncle, 2.5–3.5 cm diameter, with five pure white petals, yellowish stamens, and a superior ovary; they are hermaphroditic, and pollinated by bees. The fruit is a drupe 1–2 cm in diameter (larger in some cultivated selections), bright red to dark purple when mature in mid summer, edible, variably sweet to somewhat astringent and bitter to eat fresh; it contains a single hard-shelled stone 8–12 mm long, 7–10 mm wide and 6–8 mm thick, grooved along the flattest edge; the seed (kernel) inside the stone is 6–8 mm long. The fruit are readily eaten by numerous birds and mammals, which digest the fruit flesh and disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some rodents, and a few birds (notably the Hawfinch), also crack open the stones to eat the kernel inside. All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides. The tree exudes a gum from wounds in the bark, by which it seals the wounds to exclude insects and fungal infections. Wild cherry has been known as Gean or Mazzard (also 'massard'), both largely obsolete names in modern English, though more recently 'Mazzard' has been used to refer to a selected self-fertile cultivar that comes true from seed, and which is used as a seedling rootstock for fruiting cultivars. The name "wild cherry" has also been applied in a general or colloquial sense to other species of Prunus growing in their native habitats, particularly to Black cherry Prunus serotina. Some eighteenth and nineteenth century botanical authors ascribed an origin to western Asia based on the writings of Pliny; however, archaeological finds of seeds from prehistoric Europe contradict this view (see below). Nomenclature: The early history of its classification is somewhat confused. In the first edition of Species Plantarum (1753), Linnaeus treated it as only a variety, Prunus #8 cerasus [var.] ? avium, citing Gaspard Bauhin's Pinax theatri botanici (1596) as a synonym; his description, Cerasus racemosa hortensis ("Cherry with racemes, of gardens") shows it was described from a cultivated plant. Linnaeus then changed from a variety to a species Prunus avium in the second edition of his Flora Suecica in 1755. Prunus avium means "bird cherry" in the Latin language, a translation by Linnaeus of the species' Danish and German names (Fugle-Kirsebær, Vogel-Kirsche, respectively). In English, the name Bird cherry refers to Prunus padus. Cultivation and uses: Fruit: Wild cherries have been an item of human food for several thousands of years. The stones have been found in deposits at bronze age settlements throughout Europe, including in Britain. In one dated example, Wild cherry macrofossils were found in a core sample from the detritus beneath a dwelling at an Early and Middle Bronze Age pile-dwelling site on and in the shore of a former lake at Desenzano del Garda or Lonato, near the southern shore of Lake Garda, Italy. The date is estimated at Early Bronze Age IA, carbon dated there to 2077 plus or minus 10 B.C. The natural forest was largely cleared at that time. By 800 BC, cherries were being actively cultivated in Turkey, and soon after in Greece. As the main ancestor of the cultivated sweet cherry, the Wild cherry is one of the two cherry species which supply most of the world's commercial cultivars of edible cherry (the other is the Sour cherry Prunus cerasus, mainly used for cooking; a few other species have had a very small input). Various cherry cultivars are now grown worldwide wherever the climate is suitable; the number of cultivars is now very large. The species has also escaped from cultivation and become naturalised in some temperate regions, including southwestern Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the northeast and northwest of the United States.
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Short description:
The Journal of Forest Science states: Wild cherry trees are growing mostly as admixed and/or scattered trees in our forest stand. However, there are some stands where the wild cherry is a stand-forming species. The silvicultural measures recommended for these stands are not very common and/or very general ones and therefore the detailed analysis of its growing capacity and required crown space was done. Our data suggests that the wild cherry could be used as a stand-forming species and auxiliary (help and clean position) species at the same time. The height/frequency curve depicts two layers (two groups belonging to dominant/codominant tree classes and suppressed tree classes) of wild cherry trees in the stand. The height periodic increments for these two groups are statistically significantly different (p < 0.01) confirming that there is no transition between these two groups, i.e. suppressed trees probably never reach the future crop tree group. The practical meaning of the finding is that silvicultural operations should not be focused on these losers. The same is true of the diameter/frequency curve which basically has the same shape with two peaks depicting two layers of wild cherry trees in the stand. The vertical and horizontal structure analysis also shows that in middle aged stands wild cherry trees which are still vital could be suppressed. Their quality is low but they fulfil their auxiliary role in stands and therefore they could be kept in the stand for the nearest future.
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It is a deciduous tree growing to 15–32 m tall, with a trunk up to 1.5 m diameter. Young trees show strong apical dominance with a straight trunk and symmetrical conical crown, becoming rounded to irregular on old trees. The bark is smooth purplish-brown with prominent horizontal grey-brown lenticels on young trees, becoming thick dark blackish-brown and fissured on old trees. The leaves are alternate, simple ovoid-acute, 7–14 cm long and 4–7 cm broad, glabrous matt or sub-shiny green above, variably finely downy beneath, with a serrated margin and an acuminate tip, with a green or reddish petiole 2–3.5 cm long bearing two to five small red glands. The tip of each serrated edge of the leaves also bear small red glands. In autumn, the leaves turn orange, pink or red before falling. The flowers are produced in early spring at the same time as the new leaves, borne in corymbs of two to six together, each flower pendent on a 2–5 cm peduncle, 2.5–3.5 cm diameter, with five pure white petals, yellowish stamens, and a superior ovary; they are hermaphroditic , and pollinated by bees . The fruit is a drupe 1–2 cm in diameter (larger in some cultivated selections), bright red to dark purple when mature in mid summer, edible, variably sweet to somewhat astringent and bitter to eat fresh; it contains a single hard-shelled stone 8–12 mm long, 7–10 mm wide and 6–8 mm thick, grooved along the flattest edge; the seed (kernel) inside the stone is 6–8 mm long.The fruit are readily eaten by numerous birds and mammals , which digest the fruit flesh and disperse the seeds in their droppings. Some rodents , and a few birds (notably the Hawfinch ), also crack open the stones to eat the kernel inside. All parts of the plant except for the ripe fruit are slightly toxic, containing cyanogenic glycosides . See also List of Lepidoptera that feed on Prunus The leaves provide food for some animals, including Lepidoptera such as the case-bearer moth Coleophora anatipennella .The tree exudes a gum from wounds in the bark, by which it seals the wounds to exclude insects and fungal infections. Wild cherry has been known as Gean or Mazzard (also 'massard'), both largely obsolete names in modern English, though more recently 'Mazzard' has been used to refer to a selected self-fertile cultivar that comes true from seed, and which is used as a seedling rootstock for fruiting cultivars. The name "wild cherry" has also been applied in a general or colloquial sense to other species of Prunus growing in their native habitats, particularly to Black Cherry Prunus serotina . Literally,. the scientific name Prunis avium means " bird cherry ", which as a common name typically refers to P. padus though.Some eighteenth and nineteenth century botanical authors ascribed an origin to western Asia based on the writings of Pliny ; however, archaeological finds of seeds from prehistoric Europe contradict this view.

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Usda description:
More info on http://plants.usda.gov