Winged Sumac, Shining Sumac, Flameleaf Sumac Schmaltzia copallinum - Rhus copallinum

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Schmaltzia copallinum

Family:

Anacardiaceae

Genus:

Schmaltzia

Species:

copallinum

Common Name:

Winged Sumac, Shining Sumac, Flameleaf Sumac

Seeds Per Pound:
62,191
Quantity:
0.4 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
50
Germination:
77%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
11-18 feet
Collection Locale:
Louisiana
Crop Year:
2020
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
4
In Stock: 0.4 lb
Prices
Items are priced on a curve, you can buy any 'bulk quantity' up to what we have in stock, some examples are:
1 packet
$4.95
10 g
$14.50
1 oz
$19.95
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Pour boiling water over seed , let cool in water for 24 hours.
Stratification: cold stratify for 90 days.
Germination: sow seed 1/4" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
Other: if boiling water treatment does not allow seed to imbibe, sulfuric acid treatment is required, fall sowing in mulched beds is prefered to artificial stratification.
In a Nutshell:
* Shining sumac is often cultivated, where it is well-suited to natural and informal landscapes because it has underground runners which spread to provide dense, shrubby cover for birds and wildlife. This species is valued for ornamental planting because of its lustrous dark green foliage which turns a brilliant orange-red in fall. The fall color display is frequently enjoyed along interstate highways, as the plant readily colonizes these and other disturbed sites. The tiny, greenish-yellow flowers, borne in compact, terminal panicles, are followed by showy red clusters of berries which persist into the winter and attract wildlife. more...
* A decoction of the root has been used in the treatment of dysentery. An infusion of the roots has been used in the treatment of VD. A poultice of the root has been applied to sores and skin eruptions. A tea made from the bark has been drunk to stimulate milk flow in nursing mothers. A decoction of the bark has been used as a wash for blisters and sunburn blisters. An infusion of the leaves has been used to cleanse and purify skin eruptions. The berries were chewed in the treatment of bed-wetting and mouth sores. Some caution is advised in the use of the leaves and stems of this plant, see the notes above on toxicity. more...