Black Locust, Yellow Locust, False Acacia Robinia pseudoacacia

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Robinia pseudoacacia

Family:

Fabaceae

Genus:

Robinia

Species:

pseudoacacia

Common Name:

Black Locust, Yellow Locust, False Acacia

Seeds Per Pound:
16,116
Quantity:
57.67 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
34
Germination:
98%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
100-150 feet
Collection Locale:
Germany
Crop Year:
2019
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
4
In Stock: 57.67 lb
Prices
Items are priced on a curve, you can buy any 'bulk quantity' up to what we have in stock, some examples are:
1 packet
$2.95
1 oz
$9.95
1 lb
$21.50
1 kg
$38.00
10 lb
$145.00
50 lb
$795.00
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Soak in hot tap water, let stand in water for 24 hours,If seeds do not swell treat with boiling water.
Stratification: none required.
Germination: sow seed 1/4" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
Other: if boiling water treatment does not allow seed to imbibe, sulfuric acid treatment is required, innoculant could be used.
In a Nutshell:
* This is a quick-growing, extremely tough, loose, open tree with compound leaves which drop in pieces, creating little debris.
* It's fragrant white flowers are beloved by bees. more...
* The black locust is native in the United States from Pennsylvania to northern Georgia and westward as far as Arkansas and Oklahoma, but has been widely spread.
* Black locust is a major honey plant in the eastern US, and, having been taken and planted in France, is the source of the renowned acacia monofloral honey from France.
* In Europe it is often planted alongside streets and in parks, especially in large cities, because it tolerates pollution well.
* An essential oil is obtained from the flowers. Highly valued, it is used in perfumery.
* Black locust has nitrogen-fixing bacteria on its root system, for this reason it can grow on poor soils and is an early colonizer of disturbed areas.
* Black Locust is highly valued as firewood for wood-burning stoves, it burns slowly, with little visible flame or smoke, and has a higher heat content than any other species that grows widely in the Eastern United States, comparable to the heat content of anthracite. more...
[ edit ] Description With a trunk up to 0.8 m diameter (exceptionally up to 52 m tall [ 2 ] and 1.6 m diameter in very old trees), with thick, deeply furrowed blackish bark . The leaves are 10–25 cm long, pinnate with 9–19 oval leaflets , 2–5 cm long and 1.5–3 cm broad. Each leaf usually has a pair of short thorns at the base, 1–2 mm long or absent on adult crown shoots, up to 2 cm long on vigorous young plants. The intensely fragrant (reminiscent of orange blossoms) flowers are white, borne in pendulous racemes 8–20 cm long, and are considered edible (dipped in batter; deep-fried). The fruit is a legume 5–10 cm long, containing 4–10 seeds .Although similar in general appearance to the honey locust , it lacks that tree's characteristic long branched spines on the trunk, instead having the pairs of short thorns at the base of each leaf; the leaflets are also much broader.The black locust is native in the United States from Pennsylvania to northern Georgia and westward as far as Arkansas and Oklahoma , but has been widely spread. The tree reaches a height of seventy feet, with a trunk three or four feet in diameter and brittle branches that form an oblong narrow head. It spreads by underground shoots. The leaflets fold together in wet weather and at night; some change of position at night is a habit of the entire leguminous family. Bark: Dark gray brown tinged with red, deeply furrowed, surface inclined to scale. Branchlets at first coated with white silvery down. This soon disappears and they become pale green, afterward reddish brown. Prickles develop from stipules , are short, somewhat triangular, dilated at base, sharp, dark purple, adhering only to the bark, but persistent. Wood: Pale yellowish brown; heavy, hard, strong, close-grained and very durable in contact with the ground. The wood has a specific gravity 0.7333, and a weight of approximately 45.7 pounds per cubic foot. Winter buds: Minute, naked, three or four together, protected in a depression by a scale-like covering lined on the inner surface with a thick coat of tomentum and opening in early spring; when forming are covered by the swollen base of the petiole. Leaves: Parallel, compound, odd-pinnate, 21-40 inches long, with slender hairy petioles, grooved and swollen at the base. Leaflets petiolate, seven to nine, one to two inches long, one-half to three-fourths of an inch broad, emarginate or rounded at apex. They come out of the bud conduplicate, yellow green, covered with silvery down which soon disappears; when full grown are dull dark green above, paler beneath. Feather-veined, midvein prominent. In autumn they turn a clear pale yellow. Leafs out relatively late in spring. Stipules linear, downy, membranous at first, ultimately developing into hard woody prickles, straight or slightly curved. Each leaflet has a minute stipel which quickly falls and a short petiole. Flowers: May or June, after the leaves. Papilionaceous. Perfect, borne in loose drooping racemes four to five inches long, cream-white, about an inch long, nectar bearing, fragrant. Pedicels slender, half an inch long, dark red or reddish green. Calyx: Campanulate, gibbous, hairy, five-toothed, slightly two-lipped, dark green blotched with red, especially on the upper side teeth valvate in bud. Corolla: Imperfectly papilionaceous, petals inserted upon a tubular disk; standard white with pale yellow blotch; wings white, oblong-falcate; keel petals incurved, obtuse, united below. Stamens: Ten, inserted, with the petals, diadelphous, nine inferior, united into a tube which is cleft on the upper side, superior one free at the base. Anthers two-celled, cells opening longitudinally. Pistil: Ovary superior, linear-oblong, stipitate, one-celled; style inflexed, long, slender, bearded; stigma capitate; ovules several, two-ranked. Fruit: legume two-valved, smooth three to four inches long and half an inch broad, usually four to eight seeded. Ripens late in autumn and hangs on the branches until early spring. Seeds dark orange brown with irregular markings. Cotyledons oval, fleshy. [ 3 ]
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Physical Characteristics  Robinia pseudoacacia is a deciduous Tree growing to 25 m (82ft) by 15 m (49ft) at a fast rate. It is hardy to zone 3. It is in flower in June, and the seeds ripen from Nov to March. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by Bees.It can fix Nitrogen. It is noted for attracting wildlife. The plant prefers light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils, requires well-drained soil and can grow in nutritionally poor soil.The plant prefers acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils..It cannot grow in the shade.It requires dry or moist soil and can tolerate drought.It can tolerate atmospheric pollution.
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Usda description:
More info on http://plants.usda.gov