Hazelnut, American Hazelnut, American Filbert Corylus americana

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Corylus americana

Family:

Betulaceae

Genus:

Corylus

Species:

americana

Common Name:

Hazelnut, American Hazelnut, American Filbert

Seeds Per Pound:
360
Quantity:
121.26 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
8
Germination:
98%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
8-12 feet
Collection Locale:
Illinois
Crop Year:
2019
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
5
In Stock: 121.26 lb
Prices
Items are priced on a curve, you can buy any 'bulk quantity' up to what we have in stock, some examples are:
1 packet
6.95
1 lb
29.50
1 kg
58.00
10 lb
245.00
50 lb
995.00
100 lb
1790.00
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours.
Stratification: cold stratify for 180 days.
Germination: sow 1-2" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
Other: can be fall sown without stratification.
In a Nutshell:
* The nuts produced by American hazelnut are a preferred mast by squirrels, deer, turkey, woodpeckers, pheasants and other animals.
* American hazelnut prefers full sun for best growth and development.
* It is an often multi-stemmed shrub with long, outward growing branches that form a dense, spreading or spherical shape.
* Fall color is quite variable, ranging from attractive combinations of orange, rose, purplish red, yellow and green to undistinguished, dull yellowish green. more...
* The nuts make an excellent dessert.
* A poultice made from the bark is used to close cuts and wounds. more...
* It is planted by wildlife enthusiasts to attract and keep game in an area.
* The nuts are also grown for use in expensive cakes, cookies, and candies
* The male catkins are a food staple of ruffed grouse throughout the winter. more...

Birch family (Betulaceae). Native shrubs growing 1-3(-4) meters tall, strongly rhizomatous and forming colonial thickets; main stems (or trunk) straight, with spreading, ascending branches, the twigs slender, zigzag, light brown, with numerous stiff, red-glandular hairs. Leaves are deciduous, alternate, broadly oval with a heart-shaped or rounded base, 8-12(-15) cm long and 12 cm wide, acuminate, doubly serrate, hairy beneath, the petiole with stiff, glandular hairs. Male (staminate) and female (pistillate) flowers are separate, but both types present on each plant (the species monoecious); male flowers numerous in long, pendulous stalks (catkins) 8-10 cm long, in clusters of two or three near branch tips, appearing in the fall, but opening the following spring. Female flowers are several in a scaly bud, tiny and inconspicuous with only bright red stigma and styles protruding from the gray-brown buds, almost completely enclosed by bracts, near the end of the twigs. Fruit is a light brown, acorn-like nut 1-2 cm long, wider than long, enclosed in two, leafy, coarsely toothed (husk-like) bracts. The common name reflects its being native to North America and “hazel” is from the Old English name for filbert.

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