Port Orford Cedar, Lawson's Cypress Chamaecyparis lawsoniana

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Chamaecyparis lawsoniana

Family:

Cupressaceae

Genus:

Chamaecyparis

Species:

lawsoniana

Common Name:

Port Orford Cedar, Lawson's Cypress

Seeds Per Pound:
133,930
Quantity:
2.18 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
95
Germination:
67%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
96%
Height:
40-60 feet
Collection Locale:
Italy
Crop Year:
2018
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
6
In Stock: 2.18 lb
Prices
  • Chamaecyparis lawsoniana

Sample Bulk Pricing
1 packet
5.95
10 g
13.50
1 oz
19.95
1 lb
159.50
Growing Info:
Scarification: Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours.
Stratification: cold stratify for 60 days.
Germination: sow seed 1/8" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
In a Nutshell:
* Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (Lawson cypress) is a species of conifer in the genus Chamaecyparis, family Cupressaceae, native to Oregon and California. It occurs from sea level up to 1,500 m (4,900 ft) in the Klamath Mountains valleys, often along streams. It is called Port Orford cedar in its native locality.
* It is a large evergreen tree, maturing up to 60 m (197 ft) tall or more, with trunks 1.2–2 m (4–7 ft) in diameter, with feathery foliage in flat sprays, usually somewhat glaucous blue-green in color.
* The wood is light yet has great strength and rot resistance, and is particularly highly valued in east Asia, with large amounts being exported to Japan where it is in high demand for making coffins, and for shrines and temples. Its lumber is also known for its highly fragrant ginger aroma.
* Plants can be grown as a tall hedge. They are very tolerant of clipping so long as this does not extend into the brown barked wood since trees cannot regenerate from this. Any trimming should be done in the summer. more...
* It was first discovered (by Euro-Americans) near Port Orford in Oregon and introduced into cultivation in 1854, by collectors working for the Lawson & Son nursery in Edinburgh, Scotland, after whom it was named as Lawson Cypress by the describing botanist Andrew Murray. more...