Florida Hopbush, Native Hops, Hopsbush Dodonaea viscosa

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Dodonaea viscosa

Family:

Sapindaceae

Genus:

Dodonaea

Species:

viscosa

Common Name:

Florida Hopbush, Native Hops, Hopsbush

Seeds Per Pound:
124,850
Quantity:
0.04 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
53
Germination:
98%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
3-9 feet
Collection Locale:
HI
Crop Year:
2018
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
9
In Stock: 0.04 lb
Prices
Items are priced on a curve, you can buy any 'bulk quantity' up to what we have in stock, some examples are:
1 packet
9.95
10 g
149.95
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Soak in hot tap water, let stand in water for 24 hours, repeat process on seed that did not imbibe.
Stratification: none required.
Germination: sow seed 1/8" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
In a Nutshell:
* Dodonaea viscosa is a species of flowering plant in the soapberry family, Sapindaceae, that has a cosmopolitan distribution in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate regions of Africa, the Americas, southern Asia and Australasia.
* D. viscosa is a shrub growing to 1–3 m (3.3–9.8 ft) tall, rarely a small tree to 9 m (30 ft) tall.
* It is believed that D. viscosa flowers lack petals during evolution to increase exposure to the wind.
* The fruit is a capsule 1.5 cm (0.59 in) broad, red ripening brown, with two to four wings.
* The wood is extremely tough and durable. In New Zealand, where it is the heaviest of any native wood, the Māori have traditionally used it for making weapons, carved walking staves, axe-handles, and weights on drill shafts.
* Native Hawaiians made pou (house posts), laʻau melomelo (fishing lures), and ʻōʻō (digging sticks) from ʻaʻaliʻiwood and a red dye from the fruit.
* Dodonaea viscosa can be grown from seeds. However, pre-treatment of the seed in very hot water may be needed. more...
* The leaves are anodyne, astringent, diaphoretic, febrifuge (the var. angustissima is normally used), odontalgic and vulnerary. They are applied internally in the treatment of fevers. Externally, they are used to treat toothache, sore throats, wounds, skin rashes and stings. The leaves are apparently effective in the treatment of toothache if they are chewed without swallowing the juice. The bark is employed in astringent baths and poultices.
* Plants are very tolerant of pruning and make a good hedging plant for windy sites. more...
Usda description:
More info on http://plants.usda.gov