American Hornbeam, Hornbeam, Blue Beech, Ironwood, Musclewood, Water Beech, Muscle-beech, Smooth-barked Ironwood Carpinus caroliniana

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Carpinus caroliniana

Family:

Betulaceae

Genus:

Carpinus

Species:

caroliniana

Common Name:

American Hornbeam, Hornbeam, Blue Beech, Ironwood, Musclewood, Water Beech, Muscle-beech, Smooth-barked Ironwood

Seeds Per Pound:
21,254
Quantity:
0.09 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
39
Germination:
83%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
30-45 feet
Collection Locale:
Oregon
Crop Year:
2018
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
3

 

In Stock: 0.09 lb
Prices
Items are priced on a curve, you can buy any 'bulk quantity' up to what we have in stock, some examples are:
1 packet
4.95
10 g
12.50
1 oz
16.95
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours.
Stratification: cold stratify for 90 days.
Germination: sow seed 1/8" deep, tamp the soil, mulch the seed bed.
Other: fall sowing in mulched beds is prefered to artificial stratification.
In a Nutshell:
* Carpinus caroliniana (American hornbeam) is a small hardwood tree in the genus Carpinus. American hornbeam is also known as blue-beech, ironwood, and musclewood. It is native to eastern North America, from Minnesota and southern Ontario east to Maine, and south to eastern Texas and northern Florida. It also grows in Canada (southwest Quebec and southeast Ontario), Mexico (central and southern), Guatemala, and western Honduras.
* The bark is smooth and greenish-grey, becoming shallowly fissured in old trees.
* It is a shade-loving tree, which prefers moderate soil fertility and moisture. It has a shallow, wide-spreading root system. more...
* Too small to be exploited commercially, this high quality wood is often used locally for flooring, cogs, tool handles, golf clubs etc. It is especially suitable for making levers and is also a good fuel. more...

American hornbeam is a native, large shrub or small tree with a wide-spreading, flat-topped crown, the stems are slender, dark brown, hairy; bark gray, thin, usually smooth, with smooth, longitudinal fluting (resembling a flexed muscle). Its leaves are deciduous, arranged alternately along stems, eggshaped to elliptical in outline, ¾ to 4¾ inches long, with doubly-serrate edges. They are glabrous above, slightly to moderately pubescent beneath, especially on major veins, with or without conspicuous dark glands. During the growing season, leaves are dark green but turn yellow to orange or red in the fall. The flowers are unisexual, in catkins. The male catkins are 1 to 2½ inches long, female catkins are somewhat shorter. Both types occur on the same plant). Fruits are nutlets surrounded by a 3-winged, narrow, leaflike bract. Numerous nutlets are held together in pendulous chain-like clusters, changing from green to brown in September-October.

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