Gum Arabic Tree, Gum Arabic Acacia senegal - Senegalia senegal

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Acacia senegal

Family:

Fabaceae

Genus:

Acacia

Species:

senegal

Common Name:

Gum Arabic Tree, Gum Arabic

Seeds Per Pound:
2,724
Quantity:
1.59 lb
Average Viable Seeds/Packet:
12
Germination:
98%
Germination Test Type:
cut
Purity:
99%
Height:
20-30 feet
Collection Locale:
India
Crop Year:
2018
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
10
In Stock: 1.59 lb
Prices
Sample Bulk Pricing
1 packet
4.95
1 oz
15.95
1 lb
69.50
Growing Info:
Scarification: Pour boiling water over seed , let cool in water for 24 hours.
Stratification: none required.
In a Nutshell:
* Senegalia senegal (until recently known as Acacia senegal) is a small thorny deciduous tree from the genus Senegalia, which is known by several common names, including Gum acacia, Gum arabic tree, Sudan gum and Sudan gum arabic.
* Sudan is the source of the world's highest quality gum arabic, known locally as hashab gum in contrast to the related, but inferior, gum arabic from Red acaciaor talah gum.
* The tree is of great economic importance for the gum arabic it produces which is used as a food additive, in crafts, and as a cosmetic. The gum is drained from cuts in the bark, and an individual tree will yield 200 to 300 grams.
* New foliage is very useful as forage. Leaves and pods of S. senegal are browsed by domestic and wild ruminants.
* Dried seeds are used as food by humans.
* S. senegal fixes nitrogen within Rhizobia or nitrogen-fixing bacteria living in root nodules. This nitrogen fixation enriches the poor soils where it is grown, allowing for the rotation of other crops in naturally nutrient-poor regions.
* It has been reportedly used for its astringent properties, to treat bleeding, bronchitis, cough, diarrhea, dysentery, catarrh, gonorrhea, leprosy, typhoid feverand upper respiratory tract infections.
* S. senegal contains hentriacontane, a solid, long-chain alkane hydrocarbon. The leaf also contain the psychoactive alkaloid dimethyltryptamine. more...
Usda description:
More info on http://plants.usda.gov