Burningbush, Wahoo, Indian Arrow Wood, Eastern Wahoo Euonymus atropurpureus

Detailed Listing For
Botanical Name:

Euonymus atropurpureus

Family:

Celastraceae

Genus:

Euonymus

Species:

atropurpureus

Common Name:

Burningbush, Wahoo, Indian Arrow Wood, Eastern Wahoo

Height:
12-20ft
Minimum Hardiness Zone:
5

Seed is Out of Stock: Fill in the quantity you Need: 
Choose the "Check Out "Button and enter your contact information: 
Sheffield's will email when it arrives:  no payment at this time. Thank you

  • Euonymus atropurpureus

Please select the quantity desired, and we will advise availability and price as soon as possible.
Growing Info, follow in order:
Scarification: Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours. Soak in water, let stand in water for 24 hours.
Stratification: warm stratify for 60 days, cold stratify for 90 days.
Germination: can be sown outdoors in the fall for spring germination, sow seed 1/4 deep, tamp the soil, keep moist, mulch the seed bed. can be sown outdoors in the fall for spring germination, sow seed 1/4" deep, tamp the soil, keep moist, mulch the seed bed.
In a Nutshell:
* Euonymus atropurpureus ( Eastern Wahoo or Burning Bush ) is a species of Euonymus native to primarily to the Midwestern United States , but its range extends from southern Ontario south to northern Florida and Texas .
* Wahoo was used in various ways by the North American Indians, for example as an eye lotion, as apoultice for facial sores and for gynaecological conditions. In current herbalism it is considered to be a gallbladderremedy with laxative and diuretic properties. The bark, however, is toxic and should only be used under professional supervision, it should not be given to pregnant women or nursing mothers. more...
* Because of the shape and color of the fruit, it has been called Hearts Bursting with Love. The fruit is poisonous to humans, but is eaten by several species of birds, which disperse the seeds in their droppings.
* It grows in low meadows, open slopes, open woodland, stream banks and prairies, in moist soils, especially thickets, valleys, and forest edges. more...